Fly a kite, family picnic: Make plans for Lake Superior Day July 20, 2008 by Lake Superior Binational Forum

Make your Lake Superior Day plans now: July 20, 2008 celebrate the world’s largest, cleanest freshwater lake – annual event sponsored by Lake Superior Binational Forum, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Environment Canada


Celebrate Lake Superior Day on Sunday, July 20, 2008

Whats better than a July picnic on a hot, sandy beach next to the worlds largest freshwater lake?

A picnic and a Lake Superior celebration!

Individuals and families, churches and kids, communities and clubs, and businesses and industries hold activities or events that celebrate Lake Superior Day, held annually on the third Sunday in July (July 20 this year).

Can you do something that symbolizes your own connection to the lake on that day?

Lake Superior Day was started in the early 1990s to highlight the importance of this great water body to the basins environment and economy.

The Lake Superior Binational Forum promotes this basin-wide event to highlight the special connections people have to this unique world treasure.

Many events have been held to educate or entertain people about lake issues, special places, and recreational opportunities.

You are invited to hold activities or events that celebrate this world-class lake.

This year the theme is Lets Go Fly a Kite! to symbolize clean energy sources such as wind power.

Organize your group or family to fly a kite at your favorite beach or park on July 20!


Click on this link for more information about flying a kite on Lake Superior Day.

kite duluth pix

Families fly kites made from homemade materials off the deck of the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth.

Photo (above) from Minnesota Sea Grant Dec. 2007 newsletter: Making a Great Lake Superior by Sharon Moen.

Photo by Marie Zhuikov

Last year almost 45 groups and communities participated in some way, including special events such as dragon boat races, beach clean ups, musical concerts, library displays, church services, and signed proclamations that designate the third Sunday in July as Lake Superior Day.

Contact the Lake Superior Binational Forum to receive free color postcards and buttons to give to your Lake Superior supporters at your event.

The Forum’s website offers ideas about how the day was celebrated last year and what you can do to celebrate Lake Superior. Click on Current Projects. New information is posted regularly.

For more information email organizers – or call (715) 682-1489

lake pix

sat pix

University of Minnesota Sea Grant Foundation photo

South Carolina Map – Geology.com

Lake Superior’s surface covers 31,700 square miles, or about the size of South Carolina.

The lake is so big it could hold all the water from the other four Great Lakes, plus three more lakes the size of Lake Erie.

sub

The Johnson-Sea-Link deep-sea scientific research submersible
Photo courtesy the Public Library of Science journal via Wikipedia

In 1985, scientists using a submersible vessel descended for the first time to the deepest part, which is near the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Michigans Upper Peninsula.

Lake Superior s deepest point is 1,332 feet, which would almost cover the Sears Tower in Chicago, one of the worlds tallest buildings.

Sears Tower photo by Western Michigan University student Meghan Hurley of Glenview, Illinois.

The lake stretches approximately 350 miles from west to east, and 160 miles north to south. If you could travel along the entire Lake Superior shoreline, you would travel 1,826 miles, or the distance from Duluth to San Francisco.

The Lake Superior Binational Forum is a multi-sector stakeholder group of U.S. and Canadian volunteers that work together to provide input to governments about lake issues and educate basin residents about ways to protect and restore the lake.

Members come from Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Ontario.

Northland college logo

Northland collage

Northland College Ashland, Wisconsin photos courtesy:
Northland College, Liturgical Environments, Wayne Nasi Construction

The Forum is located in the United States at Northland College in Ashland, WI, and funded in the U.S. by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys Great Lakes National Program Office.

EPA Logo

ecosuplogo

The Canadian Forum office is at EcoSuperior in Thunder Bay, Ontario, and funded by Environment Canada.

enviroCanada logo

poster
——-
Top Ten Ways You Can Protect Lake Superior Every Day


Wisconsin DNR Map

1. Install water saving devices on your kitchen and bathroom faucets and showerheads. Purchase these at local hardware and building supply stores–most cost between one dollar and nine dollars.

2. Replace regular light bulbs with energy efficient bulbs. Burning an energy bulb requires less energy, which means power plants burn less coal and that produces less mercury in the air.

3. Never burn garbage, especially plastics or tires, in burn barrels on your property. These produce more toxins in the air than an industrial incinerator. Not only do you breathe these toxic fumes as the garbage burns, but the pollutants enter the lake when it rains.

4. Instead of burning garbage, recycle or compost what you can and throw away the rest.

5. Take your lawn and household hazardous materials to area Cleansweeps collection days in Ashland, Bayfield, Douglas, and Iron counties this summer. Call the Northwest Regional Planning Commission at 715-635-2197 for dates and locations of collections in your county.

6. Put your lawn on a chemical-free diet. Poisonous lawn herbicides and pesticides seep into waterways that end up in the lake and soil, which can hurt your family and neighbors. Lawn chemicals can also sicken or kill birds and pets. Bring these kinds of chemicals to a Cleansweep event where they are disposed of safely.

7. Never pour any liquids into a storm drain. Storm drains empty untreated liquids into a nearby river, stream, or Lake Superior.

8. When youre boating or fishing, inspect your boat and trailer and remove any plants and animals before leaving the water body. Drain water from the motor, live well, bilge, and transom before leaving the water body. Never release live bait fish in the water or live earthworms on the land or water.

9. When planning landscaping or gardening activities, use plants that are native to the region. Consult with garden centers or the Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute for a list of the best native plants for this area. Learn what non-native species look like and additional prevention tips by contacting your local state or federal natural resource management agency and ask for information and identification material for non-native species.

10. Love it! When you care about something as grand as Lake Superior, youll feel good about making sure it stays a Great Lake.


For more info contact:

Lissa Radke
US Coordinator
Lake Superior Binational Forum
Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute at Northland College
Ashland, WI
54806

715-682-1489
FAX 715-682-1218

“Water is life, and the quality of water determines the quality of life.” –Lake Superior Binational Forum vision statement

Lake Superior Day is celebrated on the third Sunday in July!

Interfaith projects to protect Lake Superior are discussed in this video by:

Rev. Tesshin Paul Lehmberg
Head Priest
Lake Superior Zendo
Zen Buddhist Temple

Rev. Jon Magnuson, LSBF board member
Lutheran Campus Ministry
Northern Michigan University
Marquette, Michigan

Supers:

South Carolina map courtesy Geology.com

The Johnson-Sea-Link deep-sea scientific research submersible
Photo courtesy the Public Library of Science journal via Wikipedia

Sears Tower photo by WMU student Meghan Hurley

Minnesota Sea Grant photo by Marie Zhuikov
Families fly kites made from homemade materials off the deck of the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth

For more info contact:

Lissa Radke
US Coordinator
Lake Superior Binational Forum
Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute at Northland College
Ashland, WI
54806

715-682-1489
FAX 715-682-1218

Lake Superior Binational Forum
http://www.superiorforum.info

Lake Superior Binational Forum vision statement:
“Water is life, and the quality of water determines the quality of life.”

Lake Superior Day is celebrated on the third Sunday in July

Related websites:

Lake Superior Binational Forum
http://www.superiorforum.info

Flying a kite on Lake Superior Day pdf:
http://www.superiorforum.info/uploads/Kite_Poster.pdf

Wisconsin DNR page on Lake Superior:
http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/nature/habitat/lakesuperior.htm

University of Minnesota Sea Grant Foundation
http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/

Minnesota Sea Grant Dec. 2007 newsletter: Making a Great Lake Superior by Sharon Moen
http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/newsletter/2007/12/making_a_great_lake_superior.html

Minnesota Sea Grant kite flying photo by Marie Zhuikov
Families fly kites made from homemade materials off the deck of the Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth.

Northland College Ashland, Wisconsin photos courtesy:

Northland College:
http://www.northland.edu/Northland

Liturgical Environments:
http://www.liturgicalenvironments.com
http://www.liturgicalenvironments.com/Images/Leaded%20Glass%20Contemporary/LdNORTHLAND-COLLEGE.jpg

Wayne Nasi Construction:
http://www.wnasi.com
http://www.wnasi.com/images/portfolio/school_northland.jpg

EcoSuperior Environmental Programs:
http://www.ecosuperior.com

Environment Canada:
http://www.ec.gc.ca/

Telephone
1-819-997-2800
Canada only:
1-800-668-6767

Johnson-Sea-Link – Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnson_Sea_Link

Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution:

http://www.hboi.edu

Submersible & crew info:
http://www.hboi.edu/marineops/jsl_crew.html

The Johnsen Lab page of Johnson-Sea-Link
http://www.biology.duke.edu/johnsenlab/gallery/insidechamber.html

Johnson-Sea-Link, deep-sea scientific research submersible built by The Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution in 1971.
Submersible was designed by Edwin Albert Link, friend of Harbor Branch founder Seward Johnson.
Image first published March 15, 2005 in the Public Library of Science journal.
Source: Gulf of Mexico Cruise SJ0107
The Public Library of Science journal website states that the content of all PLoS journals is published under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 license.

South Carolina Map – Geology.com
http://geology.com/state-map/maps/south-carolina-state-map.gif

Sears Tower photo by Western Michigan University student Meghan Hurley of Glenview, Illinois:
http://homepages.wmich.edu/~m4hurley/searstower2_skyscraper_1.jpg
http://homepages.wmich.edu/~m4hurley

Advertisements

About yoopernewsman

I am a news reporter, writer and investigative journalist and began my career about 40 years ago as a young teenager in Augusta, GA after moving south during the middle of high school. I'm a news reporter, writer & investigative journalist specializing in street news, plus Indigenous, civil rights & environment reporting. Currently volunteer media advisor for numerous American Indian & environment related nonprofits that include the Navajo Lutheran Mission in Rock Point, AZ & its executive director Rev. Dr. Lynn Hubbard, the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute (CTI) in Marquette, MI & its many projects founded by Rev. Jon Magnuson, Author Joy Ibsen of Trout Creek, MI, Celtic Christianity Today (CCT) founded by Rev. Dr. George Cairns, the Turtle Island Project founded by pastors Hubbard & Cairns. In its third summer, the CTI Zaagkii Wings & Seeds Project & its volunteers built a16-foot geodesic dome solar-powered greenhouse that was built in this summer at the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) in an effort to restore native species plants to northern Michigan. It's located at the tribe's Natural Resources Department north of L'Anse along Lake Superior. During the summer of 2010, Zaagkii Project teens built & painted 25 beautiful reliquaries that are boxes made from pine & cedar that are used to store seeds for planting & included samples of Native American medicine including sweetgrass, cedar, sage & tobacco. From April-June 2009, I promoted the EarthKeeper Tree Project that planted 12,000 trees across northern Michigan. Co-edited "Unafraid," the second book by Author Joy Ibsen of Trout Creek, MI that was printed in May 2009 based on her father's handwritten sermons she found in shoebox. I edited numerous videos for nonprofit CCT. Began career 35 years ago as teenager in Augusta, GA after moving south during middle of high school. I was co-coordinator of the 1986 original James Brown Appreciation Day in Augusta, GA, where the Godfather of Soul was always trashed by local media who didn't report anything positive about the music icon. Mr. Terence Dicks was the other co-coordinator & most recently served as chair of the Augusta Human Relations Commission and serves on the Georgia Clients Council. Mr. Brown taught us to "fight the good fight" by battling all forms of racism & evil while not uttering a bad word about those who try to block justice, respect, fairness & kindness to all. As a child, I lived in the Harbert, Michigan home built by late poet Carl Sandburg, where the legendary author penned some of his greatest works including his Chicago works & Lincoln papers. The four-story home had a sundeck on the top & a cool walk-in safe in the basement. The neighborhood (Birchwood) has numerous cottages used for other purposes by Sandburg like the milk house where they milked goats. My parents remodeled fourth floor of the home that stands atop the Lake Michigan sand dunes/bluffs. They found items that belonged to Mr. Sandburg concealed in the walls including prescription bottles with his name, reading glasses, & a small, thin metal stamp with his name. I've worked for dozens of newspapers & radio & TV stations in GA & MI. I'm volunteer media advisor for several interfaith environmental projects involving Native Americans across Upper Peninsula of MI including the Turtle Island Project, The Zaagkii Project, the Interfaith Earth Healing Initiative, EarthKeeper Initiative & the Manoomin (Wild Rice) Project. The Zaagkii Wings & Seeds Project restores bee & butterfly habitat to help pollination of plants following death of billions of bees. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community youth & Marquette teens built butterfly houses, planted/distributed 26,000 native plants to help pollinators. The Earth Healing Initiative assisted EPA Great Lakes 2008 Earth Day Challenge. EHI helped organize interfaith participation across eight states for the 100 plus recycling projects (April 2008) involving recycling millions of pounds of electronic waste & proper disposal of millions of pills/pharmaceuticals. EPA goals were exceeded by 500%. Under an EPA grant, EHI provided free media services for the cities/groups/tribes including videos & press releases. The EarthKeeper environment projects include an annual Earth Day Clean Sweep (2005-2007) at 24 free drop-off sites across a 400 mile area of northern Michigan that collected over 370 tons of household hazardous waste. The 2007 EarthKeeper Pharmaceutical Clean Sweep collected over one ton of drugs plus $500,000 in narcotics in only three hours. Some 2,000 residents participated & many brought in pharmaceuticals for their family, friends & neighbors. In 2006, 10,000 people dropped off over 320 tons of old/broken computers, cell phones & other electronic waste, all of which was recycled. In 2005, residents turned in 45 tons of household poisons & vehicle batteries. The Manoomin (Wild Rice) Project teaches teens to respect nature & themselves by having American Indian guides escort them to remote lakes & streams in northern Michigan to plant/care for wild rice. The teens test water quality to determine the best conditions for the once native grain to survive. The Turtle Island Project was co-founded in July 2007 by Rev. Lynn Hubbard of Rock Point, AR (Ex. Dir. of the Navajo Lutheran Mission) & Rev. Dr. George Cairns of Chesterton, IN, United Church of Christ minister & research professor for the Chicago Theological Seminary. TIP promotes respect for culture & heritage of indigenous peoples like American Indians. TIP is a platform for American Indians to be heard unedited by whites. Rev. Hubbard says whites don't have the knowledge or right to speak on behalf of Native Americans. I specialize in civil rights, outdoor, environmental, cops & courts reporting thanks to my late mentor Jay Mann (Jan Tillman Hutchens), an investigative reporter in Augusta, who lived by the books "Illusions" & "Jonathon Livingston Seagull." Love to fish, hunt, camp & skydive. Belong to Delta Chi national fraternity. I was active in Junior Achievement, band played cornet. With my dear friend, the Rev. Terence A. Dicks, we were the co-coordinators of the 1986 original James Brown Appreciation Day in Augusta, GA, where the Godfather of Soul was always trashed by the local media who found no reasons to print or report anything positive about the music icon. I am honored to help the human rights activist Terence Dicks - with some of his projects including the nonprofit Georgia Center for Children and Education - and the economic initiative he founded titled "Claiming A Street Named King." I am the volunteer media advisor for several environmental projects across Michigan's Upper Peninsula including EarthKeeper II - an Initiative of the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute in Marquette, MI. EarthKeepers II is an Interfaith Energy Conservation and Community Garden Initiative across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Goals: Restore Native Plants and Protect the Great Lakes from Toxins like Airborne Mercury in cooperation with the EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, U.S. Forest Service, 10 faith traditions and Native American tribes like the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Previously known as the Earth Keeper Initiative - that project included many environmental projects including an annual Earth Day Clean sweep at two dozen free drop off sites across a 400 mile area of northern Michigan. The target of the 2007 Earth Keeper Pharmaceutical Clean Sweep are all kinds of medicines. In 2006, some 10,000 people dropped off over 320 tons of old/broken computers, cell phones and other electronic waste, all of which was recycled. In 2005, residents turned in 45 tons of household poisons and vehicle batteries. The Manoomin (Wild Rice) Project taught at-risk teens (just sentenced in juvenile court) to respect nature and themselves by having American Indian guides escort them to very remote lakes and streams in northern Michigan to plant and care for wild rice. The teens conducted water quality and other tests to determine the best conditions for the once native grain to survive. I have always specialized in civil rights, outdoor, environmental, cops and courts reporting thanks to my late mentor Jay Mann (Jan Tillman Hutchens), an investigative reporter in Augusta, who lived by the book "Illusions."
This entry was posted in ABC, ABC News, air, American Indian, cable, Cable News Network, CBS, CBS News, Chinook, Chippewa, Christian, church, climate, climate change, CNN, culture, Dearborn Heights, Detroit, Detroit News, Diné, diocese, drinking water, Duluth, earth day, Earth Day 2008, Earth Healing Initiative, Earth Keeper Initiative, Earth Keepers, East Lansing, ecology, ecumenical, ELCA, environment, environmental, EPA, Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, faith, faith traditions, faith-based, First Nations Peoples, fish, Fox, Fox News, glacier, global warming, God, Great Lakes, Great Lakes 2008 Earth Day Challenge, ice caps, Indian, indigenous, Indigenous Issues, Indigenous peoples, interfaith, Ishpeming, isle, Jesus, KBIC, Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, lake, Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, Lakota, Lord, Lutheran, Lutheran Campus Ministry, Manoomin Project, media, medicines, melting, Menominee, Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Munising, national public radio, national talk show, Native America Calling, Native American, Native Plants, nature, NBC, NBC News, newspaper, non-profit, North American, northern lights, Northern Michigan University, Northern Michigan University Native American Studies, NPR, Pastor Warren Geier, pharmaceutical waste, pharmaceuticals, pills, pluralism, poisons, pollution, Potawatomi, Presbyterian, proper disposal, radio, recycle, religion, religions, Rev Jon Magnuson, river, rivers, Royal Oaks, Saint Cloud, salmon-Trout River, Sault Ste Marie, species extinction, state of Michigan, stream, streams, sulfide, sulfide mine, Sulfide mining, sulfuric acid, Superior, Traverse City, tree, trees, tribal, tribe, Turtle Island, Turtle Island Project, TV, Uncategorized, United Methodist Church, United States, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Universalist Unitarian, Upper Peninsula, USEAP, UU, volunteer, Wahkon, water, Watersmeet, Western Lake Superior Sanitary District, wild flowers, wild rice, wildlife, Wisconsin, world, world news, Wyandot, Yellow Dog Plains and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s